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WAR ON PHYSICIANS AND PATIENTS, CHAPTER 2

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I wanted to believe that the State of Indiana, my new home, was a place where wise, knowledgeable heads prevailed; a place where lawmakers did not succumb to the pressures of being politically correct while morally wrong when lives were at stake. I have even twice used this blog space to compliment them on setting up a law regarding the prescribing of opioids that clearly recognized the difference between regulations and felonies, while protecting both patients and physicians.

I was wrong. The failed war on drugs has affected the State of Indiana as it has so many others, and opioid hysteria is prevailing over perspective in government circles. The law scheduled to become effective on December 31, 2014 will include limits on every form of opioid pain relief for chronic pain patients that are so restrictive as to completely ignore the uniqueness of every patient. Pain patients differ in their perspective of pain, in their experience of pain, their tolerance for pain, and their response to ANY treatment for pain—including opioids.

The treatment of chronic pain is not amenable to cookie-cutter protocols. Nor does it fit nicely into the “15 minute per patient” rule imposed as a necessity to satisfy insurance company/corporate bureaucracy requirements. It takes time, patience and extensive knowledge to successfully treat a patient with chronic pain and disability, to try to bring that patient back to some form of productive life. When this is not possible because of the extent of the disability, then the goal must be adjusted to simply making life bearable for the patient.

Indiana lawmakers once understood these facts. Now they seem to have abandoned reality and chosen to break their own law even before it takes effect. The law demands that physicians spend an almost impossible amount of time and effort being face to face with each patient before prescribing for them – yet lawmakers who never set eyes on these patients and who collectively have no medical license or even relevant training are prescribing what an allowable course of treatment can be for any pain patient. ANY pain patient, regardless of the cause of their pain, the disability it may cause, and the length of time the patient has suffered. Regardless of their tolerance for the treatment. Regardless of their response to treatment.

A physician notes:

“Regulatory overreach has a chilling effect by making prescribers fearful of jeopardizing their licenses.  This fear can result in physicians abandoning pain sufferers, even forcing some patients to seek black market medications or illicit drugs.  Such has been the unfortunate case in states that hastily passed burdensome pain regulations.  Heroin use in these states has increased dramatically as the supply of prescription pain medications has dwindled.” http://jamespmurphymd.com/2013/10/07/an-open-letter-to-the-medical-licensing-board-of-indiana/comment-page-1/#comment-1158

Just last week WHAS News (Louisville KY) reported that since the Kentucky Pain Law of 2012, Heroin overdoses rose from 3% to 40%. Heroin overdose EMS calls have risen a stunning 700%. All this, despite the fact that heroin trafficking arrests have risen 1300%. These statistics were attributed to the “unintended consequences” of the unrealistic, overly burdensome pain regulations.

Unintended consequences. Beautiful, bright college students found dead of heroin overdose. Physicians wrongly charged with felony prescribing, found dead by their own hands. Countless patients, deprived of their medications (many without even the option of being slowly weaned off of them) turning to suicide in their pain, or alternatively, to the criminal activity of street drugs.

And all we can say is “Oops! We did not intend for this to happen.” ???? Wake up, Indiana! Don’t willfully head down this same slippery slope!

The War on Drugs has failed. The War on Physicians and Patients is close to taking more lives than the Iraq war, and ruining just as many others. Simply passing harsher and more impossible laws is NOT going to help anyone. There is a better way.

Education is the better way. We have First Aid Certification, CPR, Lifeguard training and certification – so many lifesaving training programs for the general public as well as medical personnel. We need to add Basic training programs for the public on how to deal with drugs. We need Continuing Education programs for physicians and medical personnel on how to deal with opioids. Early education and continuing education can prevent deaths and disability from drug abuse, and help physicians to prescribe knowledgably. Alliances between physicians and pharmacists in drug management programs would make a huge difference in keeping legitimate patients and their caregivers safe.

Stay on the high road. Political power should be about making Americans safe, and so far the Wars on Drugs, Physicians and Patients have failed miserably in that regard. Please do not wait until that college student dead of heroin overdose is your child, or grandchild. Fight this battle WITH the physicians, not against them.

Author: profemjay

I am a retired Professor of Sociology with interests in the Sociology of Medicine, Political Sociology, the Sociology of Development, Social Action and the Sociology of Religion.

One thought on “WAR ON PHYSICIANS AND PATIENTS, CHAPTER 2

  1. Pingback: War on Physicians and Patients | EDS Info (Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome)

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